Save the “MAHAKAL”-The Lord of the forest!

The Great Indian Elephant Safari - Help Tourism

There are between 7,200 and 11,300 elephants in Northeastern India. One large population of 3,800 to 5,800 animals ranges along the Himalayan foothills from Northern West Bengal, eastwards through Assam and Arunachal Pradesh to the border of Myanmar. The vegetation includes alluvial grasslands, moist deciduous and evergreen forest. Key conservation areas include the Manas Tiger Reserve and Namdapha Tiger Reserve, Orang National Park, Nameri Tiger Reserve, Pakke Tiger Reserve, Buxa Tiger Reserve, Gorumara National Park, Mahananda Wildlife Sanctuary. Another large population of nearly 2,000 elephants inhabits the alluvial floodplains of Kaziranga National Park and the Nagaland hills. A third population of about 1,400 elephants occurs in the Garo and Khasi hills of Meghalaya, and is under severe threat from habitat loss due to extensive shifting of cultivation. Small, scattered populations are also known from the Jaintia Hills, Cachar, Tripura, Manipur, and Mizoram.

The Great Indian Elephant Safari - Help Tourism

It is believed that Elephants were brought in for forestry operations in Andaman & Nicober islands. In the northern part of the Andaman group, on Interview Island, the company carrying out the timber extraction operations went bankrupt. Being unable to transport the elephants out of the island, they released about 40 elephants into the wild in 1962. Some elephants later swam over to North Andaman Island. These populations have turned feral, and reportedly are facing crisis of existence.

The Great Indian Elephant Safari - Help Tourism

But, a sizeable population of Tamed Elephants in the North East, Bihar and Nepal- traditionally used for carrying logs etc. are unfortunately, facing serious threat of starvation owing to factors beyond the control of their keepers or owners. These elephants might become orphans and feral unless we come forward to save them!

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